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Putting preaching into practice and helping a hobbyist out

 

I've waxed lyrical recently about the value of software preservation, particularly the preservation of software from floppy disks, and had a chance to put my philosophy to the test when a cry for help went up in a Macintosh group on Facebook.

A user was looking for a copy of disk 2 of ClarisWorks 2.0, as theirs had died. By a quirk of good fortune, I had literally just that week been donated a pile of vintage Mac stuff and a big box release of the floppy disk version ClarisWorks 2.0 was part of it! So, I got my software preservation hat on and got to work.

You'll recall from my previous articles that I've developed a specific methodology that supports a specific outcome, namely the easy sharing of files that will work seamlessly on vintage Macintosh hardware. My use of DiskCopy 6.3.3 came in for some (justified) criticism so I expanded my worldview to include the use of DiskCopy 4.2 to produce a workflow that allows for the 100% accurate rewriting of the data to floppy media. And considering that the chap making this ClarisWorks request will be doing just that, all for the good.

So, I fired up my Mac LCIII+, opened DisckCopy 4.2, inserted floppy 1, and made a disk image of it. The resulting file had a .image extension. I repeated this for disk 2, then did the same for both disks with DisckCopy 6.3.3, which produced files with the .img extension, and then opened each floppy and did a filesystem-level copy of the contents by drag/drop.

Et voila!

clarisworks 2 folder

You can see in the filesizes of the respective DC4.2 and 6.3.3 images that something different is certainly happening between these programs, with 4.2 copying the whole floppy and 6.3.3 only the contents.

An interesting exercise to interrogate my methods, and a pleasant side-effect being that a fellow Mac enthusiast was helped out!

And here's the resulting file packaged up for sharing. I compressed it as a self-extracting using Stuffit, so that it can be uncompressed on any vintage Macintosh: ClarisWorks 2.0